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Xinjiang US import sanctions looming over global supply chains

  • Global
  • Competition, EU and Trade
  • ESG

10-02-2022

On December 23, 2021, President Biden signed into law the Uyghur Forced Labor Prevention Act, which targets imports of goods sourced from or produced in the Xinjiang region of China in an effort to address allegations of forced labor. The new measures will affect a wide range of industries and supply chains around the world. Companies are obliged to apply heightened diligence and transparency requirements in Chinese-based supply chains, and anticipate extended shipment delays for US imports and possible shifts in global apparel, food, solar, electronics, and automotive sectors, among others.

In this article published by Global Trade Magazine, Associate Vedia Biton Eidelman examines the implications of the new import sanctions on supply chains, record-keeping obligations, reputational and banking risks.

On December 23, 2021, President Biden signed into law the Uyghur Forced Labor Prevention Act, which targets imports of goods sourced from or produced in the Xinjiang region of China in an effort to address allegations of forced labor. The new measures will affect a wide range of industries and supply chains around the world. Companies are obliged to apply heightened diligence and transparency requirements in Chinese-based supply chains, and anticipate extended shipment delays for US imports and possible shifts in global apparel, food, solar, electronics, and automotive sectors, among others.

In this article published by Global Trade Magazine, Associate Vedia Biton Eidelman examines the implications of the new import sanctions on supply chains, record-keeping obligations, reputational and banking risksOn December 23, 2021, President Biden signed into law the Uyghur Forced Labor Prevention Act, which targets imports of goods sourced from or produced in the Xinjiang region of China in an effort to address allegations of forced labor. The new measures will affect a wide range of industries and supply chains around the world. Companies are obliged to apply heightened diligence and transparency requirements in Chinese-based supply chains, and anticipate extended shipment delays for US imports and possible shifts in global apparel, food, solar, electronics, and automotive sectors, among others

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